January 21st, 2011

Are You a Cold Steak Fan?

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There is a debate raging out there over whether steak is just as good (or better) straight out of the fridge.

Which side do you fall on?

Now, usually these are leftovers we’re talking about — last night’s grilled filet mignon, strip steak cut up and served as a steak salad, London Broil no longer hot out of the oven.

Are you the “get it while it’s hot” kind or do you prefer the sealed in taste of a refrigerated masterpiece?

Read the debate here and let me know where you stand. Do you LOVE cold steak or is it best hot off the grill (after at least 5 minutes resting, of course)?

Tell me your thoughts!

Photo courtesy of CharlesPhoenix.com.


December 10th, 2010

Steak is On My Christmas List

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OMG!

I’m a sucker for brilliant packaging and marketing. I love pretty things. And with this little item I’m not sure if I like the packaging or what’s inside best!

Okay, I pick “inside,” but it wins by just a hair.

They must have had me in mind when they created this sweet gift box because this is a girl’s dream come true.

Holy smokes – opening up these babies on Christmas morning would make me feel like a princess – or a queen – or a princessy queen.

Plus, I’d know what I’m having for dinner later. No question.

This is just a little hint from me to you:  If you really like someone, THIS is the way to show them! You can check out all the different varieties that come in this lovely gift box here.

And, eh hem, I like boneless ribeyes. You know, just in case, well, you know.

Happy shopping!


November 26th, 2010

Beefy Black Friday!

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It’s Black Friday! It’s Black Friday!

Are you brave enough to get out there with the crowds? I’m not sure I am, but I am woman enough to jump online and take advantage of great deals happening now.

I HAVE to buy these things for the NEXT holiday, so why not save some cash while I’m at it? I just have to be quick.

So, I’m buying this baby

 

A gorgeous Chateaubriand for my holiday meal. I’ll freeze it and thaw it when I’m ready.

Then…I’m going to buy some of these to give as gifts…

Impressive gifts if I do say so myself. Filet mignon is always a winner. Who wouldn’t want to unwrap these?

So what are YOU doing this Black Friday? There are deals to be had out there!!!!! :)


October 13th, 2010

Pan Searing Steaks

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You know how to grill. You know how to broil. But are you an expert on pan searing a delicious, exquisite steak?

Here are a few tips on this yummy cooking method from the Kansas City Steak Company. Don’t forget that there are slightly different methods for different cuts. Did ya know that?

Me neither.

Check out the article here and let me know how it goes for you!

Photo courtesy of KansasCitySteaks.com.


August 20th, 2010

Cuts of Beef Simplified

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This just simply rocks.

If you’ve ever been baffled by what cut is what, this guide is for you.

Our friends at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Cattlemen’s Beef Board put this together to make life easier for us. Wasn’t that nice?

Keep it bookmarked so you can refer to it again and again.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Guide courtesy of BBQGuide.com.


August 12th, 2010

Man-Sized Steak

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We visited some dear friends last weekend. To make things even better, we caught up over some hearty, juicy steaks.

One of our buds set his sights on this baby . . .

Yes, siree. That’s a 25-oz. Porterhouse. I know, I know. The photo quality leaves a lot to be desired. Cell phone. Darkly-lit restaurant. You do what you can.

Anyway, you might think our friend had a nice little doggie bag to take home with him.

Think again.

Every inch of that Porterhouse was devoured. As was everyone else’s. Ribeyes, filets — delicious meats.

I can’t think of a better way to enjoy a friendship than over a great steak — can you?


July 8th, 2010

Perfect Steak in 20 Minutes

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This video shows you how to cook a great filet mignon indoors in about 20 minutes.

If it has been raining lots where you are, don’t fret! You can still enjoy a great summertime steak. Just cook it inside. Listen to his tips and watch how he works his magic.

Try this out!


June 28th, 2010

8 of the Most Expensive Cuts of Beef You Never Knew You HAD to Have!

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8 of the Most Expensive Cuts of Beef You Never Knew You HAD to Have!

You love steak, and even in a recession you want the best that money can buy.  But how much money are you really willing to drop to buy the “perfect” steak?

Let’s say you have an unlimited budget…what would be the best steak that your money could buy?  Here’s a list of the 8 most expensive types of beef.  The prices listed below are based on USDA Prime quality beef, but prices will vary according to your geographic location, the portion size, and grade of beef selected.

Not all beef is created equal.  If you want to eat the best steak of your life, it’s gonna cost you…and it’ll be worth every penny.

The Best of the Best

1)    Kobe Beef

This beef comes only from Kobe, Japan; therefore, costs more the further you travel from Japan.  What makes it so special?  Well, it comes from Wagyu cows that have been massaged with sake-fed grain fodder and given one beer a day.  This makes the beef tender, flavorful and wonderfully marbled.  You can find this in most of the top, high-end steakhouses in the U.S. like Japonais in Chicago.

At the Renga-tei Restaurant in Kobe, a cut of Wagyu, wrapped in rice paper and seared on an iron grill, then served with salmon and salad is $206.  Chef Varley’s “Triple Seared” Japanese Kobe in Las Vegas costs $33 an ounce.  So, an eight-ounce serving is $264.

www.jenius.com.au

2)    American Wagyu

This type of beef comes from Wagyu cows imported from Japan but raised here in the U.S.  They are rare (there aren’t very many of them) so they are expensive.  They, too, are tender and very flavorful.  You can find this type of beef at BLT Steak in New York City.  There, an American Wagyu 12-oz. ribeye runs $92.

3)    Tenderloin

Typically, the most expensive cuts of beef are taken from the most tender parts of the cow.  These are the parts that don’t get “overworked” in the animal’s lifetime.  Therefore, they’re tender.  Tenderloin is an amazing example of this.  Try The Tenderloin Room in St. Louis.

The “Pepperloin a la Tenderloin” dish at the Tenderloin Room (which consists of slices of specially seasoned, marinated tenderloin) costs $38.

4)    Filet Mignon

Now, this is exquisite.  Filet mignon is taken from the small end of the tenderloin (called the short loin) and is known as the “king of steaks.”  It can often be cut with a fork, it’s so tender.  My mouth is watering just thinking about it.  You can find delectable filet mignon at most any upscale steakhouse, but I prefer an at-home version delivered by the Kansas City Steak Company.  They’re widely known for their corn-fed beef – especially the filet mignon.

A 12-oz. filet at BLT Steak in NYC is $42.  Six 6-oz. filets from Kansas City Steak Company run $64.95.  Definitely a better buy.

www.kansascitysteaks.com

5)    Kansas City Strip

Strip steaks, taken from the short loin, are particularly tender, but not as tender as the tenderloin.  They can, however, but cut into thicker portions which is appealing to lovers of more rare beef.

Sometimes called New York Strip or Delmonico, you can find strip steaks just about everywhere!

www.ruthschris.com

6)    Porterhouse

Ahhh, the Porterhouse!  Part tenderloin and part strip steak, this hefty favorite divides the two with a bone that helps provide amazing flavor.  The Porterhouse has a larger side of tenderloin than the strip.  A T-bone is just the opposite.  Peter Luger Steak House in Brooklyn, NY, is famous for its 2-person Porterhouse.  Newsday describes it as “Fibrous, mineral-sweet beef, crusty and tender.”  Yum!

A single Porterhouse at the Tenderloin Room in St. Louis runs $39.

www.peterluger.com

7)    T-Bone

The yin to the Porterhouse’s yang, the T-bone is a more conventional favorite, yet still pricey in upscale restaurants.  The fact that this type of steak comes from the short loin section of the cow (and, thus, the most tender) makes it expensive.  Find a great T-bone at Ruth’s Chris Steak Houses across the country.  A good bet.

8)    Bone-in Ribeye (Cote de Boeuf)

It’s the bone that gives this cut its flavor.  Leave the bone in and you leave the rich flavor intact.  The ribeye comes from the rib section of the cow, which gives it its hearty flavor.  Bob’s Steak and Chop House in Dallas, TX, has a bone-in beauty to die for!

www.tenderloinroom.com


May 19th, 2010

Citrus + Steak = Heaven

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I’m sorry, will you look at that?

I love, love, love when my food is as beautiful as it is tasty.

Gorgeous oranges, dark, lovely greens and — of course — the star of the show lightly pink filet mignon.

Click here for more on this wonderful, light, flavorful steak salad.

It’s yummy. It’s healthy. And it can be yours.

Try it and let me know what you think!

Photo courtesy of designeatplay.com.


February 15th, 2010

Steak — Presidents Love It

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It’s President’s Day and we all know that presidents LOVE steak.

Are you sure, you say? Where are you getting your information?

Well . . .

Here, I talked about past and present presidents chowing down on steak at important get-togethers.

And here, I talked about President Lincoln’s inaugural ball menu which included, what else? Steak and lots and lots of beef choices.

So, kids, wanna grow up to be big and strong like our president? Then it stands to reason that all Americans should enjoy their favorite steak today in honor of our nation’s presidents — and those who will one day hold that office.

And, yes, a leftover slice of filet from your Valentine’s Day dinner counts. Do it for your country!

Happy President’s Day!

Photo courtesy Seth Perlman/AP.


January 22nd, 2010

Slap Your Granny Steak

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Okay, I hate the name. Slapping anyone’s granny sounds like a horrible idea to me. But that’s what it’s called so we’ll go with that.

This steak is apparently “so good you’ll wanna slap your granny.” You marinate your steaks in a yummy Worcestershire/soy concoction inside a bag until it’s good and infused with flavor. Then you grill them.

Hold onto your Hoverround chair, cuz this stuff is good!

Don’t those look brimming with flavor???

Here’s the skinny on this recipe from “Stay At Home Dad” over at Hubpages.com.  Enjoy! (And please, don’t really slap your granny. She’s a nice lady.)

Slap Your Grandma Good!

I am not an advocate of violence and I have never actually slapped my grandmother, but this steak recipe is so good I wanted to make sure the title would get your attention.

This recipe is a variation of the one my mom taught me. I have spent years perfecting it and my wife loves it. I have designated it my ‘go to recipe’ when I have done something to upset her. It is quick and easy and guaranteed to produce the best steak you’ve ever had!

Prep time: 5 minutes

Marinate time: 1-3 hours (depending on the cut of beef)

Cook time: 10-15 minutes (depending on the cut of beef and thickness)

The Marinade

1/2 cup Worcestershire sauce (I think Lea & Perrin’s is best)

1/3 cup soy sauce ( I use Kikkoman’s)

1/2 cup A-1 steak sauce

3 Tbls. McCormick Grill Mates Montreal Steak seasoning

*A little fresh minced garlic is optional- but also very good!

I should say that I NEVER measure anything when I put this together. The measurements here are merely suggestions. My only advice is to go a little lighter on the soy than the Worcestershire. I use the soy to take a little of the ‘sweetness’ out of the Worcestershire.

Marinating in the Bag

The Steak

If you don’t have a favorite steak, I highly recommend the Ribeye. It isn’t the most expensive cut, but you cannot beat the flavor. This recipe is for two ribeye steaks- adjust accordingly if you are cooking more.

How to put it all Together

In a large zip lock bag combine all the ingredients and slosh around a bit to mix thoroughly. Add the steaks and zip the bag closed. Slosh around a bit more and be sure to coat each steak completely and refrigerate. For ribeyes, it is best not to marinate for more than two hours. I have marinated for 30 minutes if I am in a hurry, but a 1-2 hours is best.

You may need to experiment a little with the marinade times on other steaks. The following times are what I use when I splurge for more expensive cuts:

1-3 hours are best for strips

1-2 hours for Porterhouse and T-bones

30 minutes or less for Filets

I normally turn the bag over 2 or 3 times while they marinate, but it isn’t necessary. About 20 minutes before you put them on the grill, remove the steaks from the refrigerator and allow them to warm to room temperature.

Time to Light the Grill

I use a Weber charcoal grill when I cook steaks. After you light the grill and allow the coals to begin to ash on each corner, push all the coals to the outside edge of the grill. I have found the best results when I cook the steaks over the center of the grill, not directly above the coals. I have heard this referred to as ‘indirect’ cooking. If you use a gas grill, preheat on highest setting, then reduce to low heat. You may need to adjust your cook times on a gas grill.

*I never cook steaks without baked potatoes. I recommend using large russets and I have a great way to prepare them while the steaks are cooking. I’ll let you in on my secret at the bottom of this post…

Grill set up

Cooking Tips and Times

After many years of trial and error, I broke down and bought a meat thermometer. It was the best $10 I ever spent.

For best flavor, do not remove any fat prior to cooking. Place steaks in the middle of the grill. We prefer our ribeyes cooked medium rare. For steaks cut ¾ inches thick, do not cook more than 5 minutes per side. I try to only turn my steaks once during cooking. ALWAYS use tongs to handle steaks. To insure juiciness, never pierce the steaks while cooking. Keep the lid on the grill as much as possible. After approximately 8 minutes, I use a meat thermometer to check the temperature. Steaks will heat up to an additional 10 degrees after you remove them from the grill, so for medium rare remove the meat from the grill when the temperature at the thickest section reaches 135F. If you do not have a meat thermometer, DO NOT cook more than 10 minutes. You can always put them back on if they are not cooked enough.

On the grill

Suggested Temperatures for Doneness

145F for medium rare

160F for medium

170F for well done

Serve with your favorite sides and enjoy!

Baked Potato Secret

For two large baked potatoes:

Pierce each potato through with a knife in 2-3 places

Microwave two potatoes for 5 minutes on each side (10 minutes total)

Wrap with aluminum foil and place directly on the coals about 10 minutes before the steaks go on

Turn the potatoes once about the same time you turn the steaks

There is no set amount of time to leave the potatoes on the coals, but a minimum of 20 minutes is what I recommend. Top with your favorite toppings and enjoy!

Recipe and photo courtesy of Hubpages.com.


January 1st, 2010

Steak Recipe: Herb-Crusted Filet Mignon

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Happy New Year, everyone!!!

And to welcome 2010, it only seems appropriate to cook some fantabulous steaks, right?

If you’re going to do it, why not just go for it and spring for the most tender cut — the amazing filet mignon?

Here, Derrick Riches gives us his incredible recipe for herb-crusted filets. Enjoy!

primeFilet_lores09_lrg

Herb-Crusted Filet Mignon

What can be better than filet mignon? It’s delicious and tender. This recipe calls for dried herbs though you can substitute with fresh herbs instead. If you are going to do so, double the amount that the recipe requires.

Prep Time: 15 minutes

Cook Time: 10 minutes

Ingredients:

4 filet mignon, about 1 1/2 inches thick

4 tablespoons olive oil

2 cloves garlic, minced

1 teaspoon rosemary

1 teaspoon thyme

1 teaspoon marjoram

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

Preparation:

Heat olive oil and garlic in a covered microwave safe bowl for 50-60 seconds. Remove and allow to cool. Add herbs and stir. Place filet mignon into a shallow glass dish. Pour herb mixture over and turn steaks to coat. Cover and let marinate for 1-4 hours in refrigerator. Preheat grill for high heat. Remove steaks, remove excess oil, and season with salt and pepper. Place on grill and cook for 5-6 minutes per side. Remove from heat and serve.

Recipe courtesy of About.com.

Photo courtesy of KansasCitySteaks.com.


December 25th, 2009

Merry Christmas, Steak!

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If you celebrate Christmas today, have a merry, merry one!

More and more families are celebrating this day with a sumptuous steak dinner.

steaklg

This photo is of a luscious filet with herb butter. The rest of the menu consists of a creamy potato casserole, carrot pineapple salad, a brie with cherry chutney as an appetizer and a caramel banana cream pie for dessert.

Does yum come any bigger than that?

Check out all the recipe details here and don’t forget to let me know what you think!

Photo courtesy of Linda Larsen at BusyCooks.About.com.


December 23rd, 2009

Christmas Eve Steak

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I give you “Mr. Miyagi’s” steak dinner for Christmas Eve. . .

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A filet in miso butter with mashed peas and asparagus.

Beautiful.

What are you going to cook for Christmas Eve dinner? Do you have special food traditions for the holidays?

Have a wonderful Christmas Eve tomorrow! May it be filled with tantalizing steak!

Photo courtesy of Mr. Miyagi on flickr.com.


December 21st, 2009

The 12 Meats of Christmas

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prime_lrg08_Detail

Sometimes holiday classic tunes need a little updating.  And what better way to spend the 12 Days of Christmas than with the ones you love?

The foods you love, that is.

So here it goes . . . cue the carolers!

“The 12 Meats of Christmas”

On the twelfth day of Christmas, KC Steaks shipped to me:

Twelve roasts a-roasting,

Eleven pork chops sizzling,

Ten seasonings seasoning,

Nine strip steaks smoking,

Eight ribs a-braising,

Seven filets mignon-ing,

Six ribeyes marbling,

Five ste-ak-burgers, (pause, pause, pause)

Four T-bones,

Three prime ribs,

Two tenderloin,

And a hickory smoked tur-r-r-r-key!!!

Whew!  I’m tired.  And hungry.

Wanna send your own 12 Meats of Christmas?  Start here!

Photo courtesy of KansasCitySteaks.com.