October 27th, 2011

Cooking Filet Mignon Video

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Filet Mignon from Kansas City Steak Company on Vimeo.

The corporate chef at the Kansas City Steak Company has some great tips for us on how to cook a fantastic filet.

Thank goodness. I’m going to be listening up because I don’t always know what I’m doing at the helm of a grill. Any advice he has would be a good thing for me to pay attention to.

And I certainly wouldn’t want to ruin a perfectly beautiful filet mignon! That would be a crime.

Check out the video here and get the perfect filet to grill while you’re at it!

Happy grilling, everybody!


July 26th, 2011

Humidifier for Steaks?

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Have you seen this gadget?

It’s a grill humidifier. You pour in any liquid whose flavor you’d like to see infused in your meat, set it on the grill next to your steak – and voila!

It flavors the meat while you grill.

I can see so many possibilities with this. Orange juice. Beer. Vodka steak?

I don’t know, would the vodka explode?

Anyway, it’s an interesting theory. I wonder if it truly does work in reality.

Has anyone ever tried this? It sounds yummy!

Photo courtesy of CoolMaterial.com

 

 

 


June 17th, 2011

Grill Guru Father’s Day Steak Tips

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Grill Guru Gives Father’s Day Steak Tips: MyFoxTWINCITIES.com

You want to cook the best steak possible for Dad this weekend, right?

Well, the Grill Guru is here to help you in that endeavor. Check out this video with tips to make Father’s Day less crispy and burnt.

And, really, we all want that in the end.

Have a safe, relaxing, joyous – and tasty – Father’s Day, everyone! I’ll be giving a shoutout and a steak to my papa this Sunday. He’s done a lot for me and now it’s time to celebrate him!


June 15th, 2011

Video Tips on Grilling Steak

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Good Day Café: Grilling Steak: MyFoxNY.com

It’s that time of year! So many things to celebrate – Father’s Day, graduations . . . summer!

And how do we celebrate things around here? Why, with food, of course!

So to help us do that, here’s a video of Arturo McLeod, executive chef at Benjamin Steak House in NYC, showing us exactly how to grill that perfect steak or burger.

My favorite takeaway from this one? Heat your grill 30-45 minutes before putting on the steaks.

Now that’s a HOT grill! Makes sense, though.

Mmmm, I can hear that beef sizzling now . . .

 


May 11th, 2011

Eat More Steak – It’s BBQ Month!

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So, it’s National BBQ Month. Who knew?

Apparently, lots of people knew – and know. This thing is huge, people.

In celebration of National BBQ Month, here are some hints for making it successful from D Magazine (D as in Dallas – and they know barbecue).

Be sure to heed the advice about when exactly to put those steaks on the grill.

Hint:  Ya gotta give it time.

Click here to see those tips – and click here for more ways to get the most bang for your buck outta National BBQ Month. Let’s milk this thing, folks!

I hope YOU go all-out to celebrate this special month. It deserves to be feted!!!

Photo courtesy of WikiHow.com.

 


January 18th, 2011

Steak Fun Facts

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If you’re here, you probably love a great steak.

But here are a few fun tidbits you might not know about our beloved beef. Read on!

History

  • Although meat has been grilled since shortly after the discovery of fire–some 500,000 years ago–it did not become a popular pastime until the 1950s.
  • Time Frame

  • Depending on the cut of the steak, it may take between 10 and 30 minutes to cook on the grill; thicker cuts, such as filet mignon and T-bone, generally take the most time to grill.
  • Benefits

  • Grilling is an exceptionally healthy method of cooking steak and other kinds of meat because excess fat drains away rather than being consumed.
  • Fun Fact

  • The charcoal briquette was invented in 1920 by Henry Ford, with help from Thomas Edison.
  • Warning

  • Most injuries related to grilling are caused by improper use of starter fluid, such as adding additional fluid after lighting an outdoor grill.
  • Considerations

  • If you want to produce “grill marks” when making steak, avoid moving the steak except to turn it–only once–during the course of cooking.
  • Read more: Facts on Grilling Steak | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/facts_4567438_grilling-steak.html#ixzz1BQ8Xn2iX


    September 10th, 2010

    3 Ways to Cook a Great Steak

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    There are all sorts of helpful hints out there to get you on your way to the perfect steak.

    Here’s an article with important tips to create your most amazing meal and three of the best ways to cook it.

    It’s always good to heed time-tested advice — especially when it comes to something as critical as steak!

    Listen to the experts, I say. This is too important to mess up!

    Check it out here. And let me know how your incredible meal goes . . .

    Photo courtesy of StartCooking.com.


    September 9th, 2010

    Flip Your Steaks By Hand

    By

    I’m often up late at night. The TV is on and you can imagine what kinds of ads I see.

    Everything from “enhancement” products to hearing aids to – well – THIS:

    It’s the Grill Glove!

    Seriously, you put it on, reach right on that hot grill, grab your steak, flip it and all is well!

    It’s even dishwasher safe. Bonus.

    I don’t know what I think about this. Will I accidently burn part the of my arm that’s not covered by the glove as I reach over HOT FLAMES?

    Also, do I want to actually pick up my steak with my hand as it is cooking? I’m worried about the “ick” factor here. Will it feel mushy?  

    On the other hand, Anthony Sullivan is endorsing it. So you know it has to be top notch.

    Who’s Anthony Sullivan again?

    What do you think? Do you have any experience with the Grill Glove? Or is this a flash in the pan?

    Photo courtesy of GrillGlove.com.


    August 31st, 2010

    Steak Tips From Your iPhone!

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    Okay, this is so cool. Technology absolutely rocks.

    The Kansas City Steak Company now has a free iPhone app that lets you select your favorite cut of meat (you know, T-bone, filet mignon, etc.), choose a thickness and how well done you’d like your steak and then the app’s timer will tell you how long to cook it and when to flip it.

    Genius.

    Besides that, it has tons of recipes, grilling tips and a steak reference library. How awesome is that?

    Go here, check it out, then download the app on your phone and have fun playing with it. It’s free and it’s my new obsession. 

    Let me know what you think. I’m dying to know if you try it out this Labor Day weekend!!


    July 21st, 2010

    Steakburger Secret

    By

    How have I gone my whole life not knowing this tidbit?

    I have just learned the ultimate secret to making perfect patties. The next time you cook steakburgers you must try it.

    Elizabeth Karmel, a total grilling diva, tells us that putting a thumbprint in the middle of your burger before placing it on the grill keeps it flat and avoids the “swollen belly burger” syndrome.

    Who knew? Well, apparently this is a technique the restaurants have been holding close to the vest for years. I feel so “in the know!”

    Elizabeth even hawks a “Steakhouse Burger Press” that automatically shapes your patties and includes a thumbprint on each one. How’s that for efficient?

    You can check out her burger press here. Get your steakburgers here . . . and happy thumbprinting!!!


    June 18th, 2010

    Steak. You Know Dad Wants It.

    By

    It’s Father’s Day on Sunday. Got good plans for your old man?

    Well, you can’t go wrong cooking him a steak dinner. I’m serious. He’ll love it.

    The Houston Chronicle had an article recently giving some great grilling advice from the experts. Check it out — and then treat Dad to something special.

    Happy Father’s Day!

    Photo courtesy of Steve Giralt, Food Network Magazine via Chron.com.


    June 8th, 2010

    Summer Steakburgers

    By

    These amazing steakburgers (just look at that beauty!) are perfect for summer get-togethers.

    This is truly a STEAKburger. Steakburgers are made from . . . well, steaks.

    This one is ribeye. Oh, yum!

    These guys ground up their own ribeyes to make these steakburgers. You can do it too.

    OR, you can buy them ready-to-go here.

    Check this out to see exactly how it’s done!

    Photo courtesy of Food-e-Matters.com.


    February 16th, 2010

    Top 10 Steak Grilling Tips

    By

    Top 10 Steak Grilling Tips (From a Real-Live Chef!)

    If you think grilling a steak is as simple as slapping a piece of meat you bought at the supermarket on a grill and flipping it a few times, you’re missing out on what could be THE GREATEST STEAK OF YOUR LIFE.

    Here are some grilling tips from an honest-to-goodness chef that’ll make your next steak meal your finest work ever.

    1. Choose the right cut of meat — Some cuts of meat are better for grilling than others. I, personally, prefer to grill strip steaks over other cuts because you get a nice combination of fat and meat for a great flavor. Filet mignon, on the other hand, I prefer to pan sear because it is so lean and I can add fat and flavors in the pan.  Experiment!  Ultimately, no one can tell you what you like, you have to find it for yourself.  Here are the pros and cons of each cut:

    2. Choose the right quality of meat — Nothing ruins a good steak dinner like a bad steak. A lot of places sell poor quality meat, so make sure you choose a reputable supplier so you know you are getting your money’s worth.  I always find premium quality steaks online.  By law, all meats are inspected for wholesomeness so no one is selling you meat that will kill you, but grading is a voluntary system.  Meats are graded on several categories, including the marbling of fat and the amount of connective tissue.  Sure, it may be fit to eat but do you want to eat it?  Prime is the highest quality, followed by choice and select.  Choice meats are very high quality steaks and the most common steak used in the restaurant industry. Here are a few pointers to track down the perfect quality & cut of steak:

    • Get to know your butcher, call and ask when they receive orders
    • Special order cuts you know you want
    • Ask them to cut meat just for you (you’d be surprised what they will do for you)
    • Order just the grade that you want
    • Ask how long they keep their steaks if they don’t sell them

    3. Season early — You should salt your meat even before you start your coals. If you throw salt on right before you put it on the grill you end up leaving salt all over the grill, not on your steak. So season your steaks about fifteen minutes before you put them on the grill. That gives the salt a chance to dissolve and evenly flavor your meat.  Sea salt is all the rage now and chefs like to fancy up a plate by using specialty salts like Hawaiian Pink Salt or Fleur de Sel. Sometimes a little good salt is all that a steak needs.

    4. Take ‘em out early — Let your steaks sit on the counter for at least twenty minutes. I know it doesn’t seem sanitary, but since steaks are whole muscles and you are cooking the outside well above safe levels, you won’t need to worry so much about food-borne illness. The problem with throwing your steaks on the grill right out of the refrigerator is that it will take them a lot longer to cook. Steaks at room temperature take seasoning better and will cook faster. Unfortunately, meat takes time to cook and if you are in too much of a hurry to cook it you are probably in too much of a hurry to really enjoy it.  Take your time and learn to enjoy cooking your steak almost as much as eating it.

    5. Use charcoal — Gas grills work great for cooking food but can sometimes impart a gas flavor to your meat. I like to use natural hardwood charcoal started in a chimney. Don’t use lighter fluid; it defeats the purpose of using hardwood charcoal.  You want to smell the steak roasting over the coals – that is the best part! Some people swear by mesquite soaked in apple juice others say you cook your steak too fast to get any benefit.  Wood chips can add flavor if you are smoking your meat but that usually takes a lot more time than it takes to grill a steak.  My recommendation is that if you are curious, play around see if you can taste and enjoy the difference.

    6. Hot coals — Set your coals up so that you have zones of cooking. Always start off on a hot spot. You want good color and flavor from the high heat. When you flip it, don’t put it down on the same spot as before — it will be cooler. Find another hot spot to continue getting good color and flavor.

    7. Don’t touch it! — This is one of the biggest mistakes a home cook makes. Everyone wants to keep checking the food to see if it is done. Leave it alone. Know how thick your steak is and roughly how long it takes to cook. Flip it once and give it a quarter turn once on each side. The more you touch it the better chance you have of screwing it up. Check out this grilling chart as a guide on how to cook steaks:

    Grilling Chart courtesy of www.kansascitysteaks.com

    8. Make it pretty — Use the hot grill to create “cross-hatch” grill marks. Set your steak down at a 45-degree angle from your grill lines. About a quarter of the way through cooking, give it a quarter turn. Half-way through cooking, flip it once. Give it a final quarter turn for the last bit of cooking. When finished you should have a steak that looks like it belongs on a commercial. This might not be the most important thing in your day, but if you’re on a first date or trying to impress then try this!

    9. Leave it alone — There’s nothing worse than taking a beautiful steak and covering it with other flavors. Sauces, rubs and butters are fine but if I’m going to eat a steak I like to taste steak. If you are using a lesser cut of meat or poorer quality, marinades are a great tool. But we are talking steak here and all it needs is a little salt, pepper and some heat to cook over.  So refer to rule #2 and source and buy only good quality meat.

    10. Make all your condiments early — One trap many people fall into when they grill meat is trying to cook the rest of the meal at the same time. Your kitchen is inside; your grill (if you are following tip #5) should be outside. Don’t try to run between the two. You will only end up ruining your steak or your side dish — or both. Plan your meal to get your extras done early so you can focus solely on your grilling. I mean, it deserves it, doesn’t it? I like a simple compound butter made of softened, unsalted butter, garlic, a little red wine and some cracked pepper. Mix it all together, (in a mixer, if you can, so it is smooth), roll it in plastic wrap and put it in the fridge up to two weeks before you cook your steak. One pat on top of each steak can be a nice treat.


    November 18th, 2009

    Tips for a Great Steak

    By

    So you think you’ve got it down, this whole grilling thing. I mean, you just fire up the grill, stick on your steaks, turn them and eyeball when they’re done, right?

    You COULD do it that way. But you might be disappointed with the results.

    Here’s a handy dandy tip center to help you get the most out of each cut of steak.  Did you know that cooking a filet mignon is a bit different than cooking, say, a T-bone?

    pepperBaconFilet_lrg

    The Kansas City Steak Company gives us some pointers on the best way to cook each cut of steak here.

    Here’s a sample . . . read it, follow it, enjoy!

    Preparing Filet Mignon

    • This cut is so tender that it should never be cooked beyond medium-rare. The longer you cook it, the less tender and drier it becomes 

    • Use a dry, high heat method such as grilling, roasting, pan-frying, or broiling 

    • Cutting into the meat to check doneness lets juice escape. Use the touch method. Touch the meat. If it feels soft and leaves an imprint, it is rare. If it is soft but slightly resilient, it is medium-rare. When it feels firm, it is overdone 

    • Filets are a thick steak, so grill the sides as well as the top and bottom

    Excerpt and photo courtesy of KansasCitySteaks.com.


    October 15th, 2009

    Tips: Steak on a Charcoal Grill

    By

    Happy day! Super-Cali-Fragilistic Sister-in-Law Chef Sandy weighs in today on the use of a charcoal grill versus gas.

    There are some fierce proponents of each. Here, Sandy tells us the ins and outs of using charcoal to cook that gorgeous steak. Enjoy!

    612708f8-61b0-4366-a6cb-5a478b4c60cc_300

    Using A Charcoal Grill

    Right before Hurricane Ike hit Houston last year, my husband and I decided we needed to have a grill, just in case we lost electricity for a while.  We had left our old gas grill behind when we moved, and had planned on replacing it when we got settled in our new home.  Well, the day before a hurricane hits is no time to buy a grill, we discovered, and we were not able to find a gas grill anywhere in the Houston area.  The only thing we could find was a few bags of charcoal and a camping sized charcoal grill.

    Given that there were no other options, we went with the charcoal grill and quickly learned some of the nuances which make this just a little more complicated then firing up a gas grill.  I do feel like I have mastered a few tricks which I would like to share with you, whether you are a new user, or someone who may just do the charcoal thing occasionally, like when you are camping or picnicking at a state park.

    If you are a long-time charcoal griller, you’ll probably be familiar with all of this.  My intended audience is those who have not often had success with charcoal, but would like to give it a try.  Gas grills are certainly a convenient option, but if for whatever reason or preference drives you to use a charcoal grill here are some things that might help you have success.

    The charcoal grill has two grates — one is intended to support the charcoal at the bottom of the grill, the other is to cook your food on.  The lower grate holds the charcoal up slightly from the bottom of the grill so that oxygen can get to the pile of briquettes.  Use about 6 total sheets of newspaper, rolled tightly into 2 rolls. Form an X at the bottom of the grill with the 2 rolls of newspaper, and place the bottom grate on top of the newspaper to hold it in place.

    Next, form a pyramid of the charcoal, so that it will burn efficiently and not require too much starter fluid.  The amount of charcoal you will want to use is limited by the size of the grill, of course, but also should be determined by how much you want to cook.  A couple of burgers may only need something like 30 briquettes, but pounds and pounds of steaks and chicken will take longer to cook, therefore you will need a fire that burns longer — plus more briquettes.

    Once you have a nice square pyramid (ask your fourth grader!) squirt the pile with the recommended amount of lighter fluid.  Don’t forget to read the package.  It is usually just a couple-second squirt.  Don’t be that guy who squirts half a bottle of lighter fluid onto a pile of burning charcoal – this is dangerous and foolish and stinks!  Put the top back on the bottle and put it far from the fire, before you light a match.  Light the ends of your paper tubes, which should fairly quickly catch the pile of briquettes on fire.

    After about 20 minutes, when the briquettes are covered with ash and the flames have died down, use a fire-proof implement to spread the hot charcoal evenly on the grate.  Please use every safety precaution.  Sparks can and will fly up.  Replace the clean cooking grate on top of the hot charcoal and you are ready to cook.

    Enjoy the smokier flavor that charcoal grilling imparts to your food — you may become a convert!

    Photo of Weber charcoal grill courtesy of HomeDepot.com.


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    About Me

    Hi! My name is Dena P., and I love steak. In fact, I’ve been on a quest for the perfect steak for a few years now.

    I love experimenting with food and I like to get my family, friends and neighbors involved. They add a lot to my cooking experience by helping me perfect techniques and sharing recipes.

    Read More About Me »

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