July 13th, 2012

Friday the 13th Steak Bites

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It’s Friday the 13th!

I’m not very superstitious, but this day does have kind of a Halloweeny-type feel, doesn’t it?

And in that spirit I give you. . . Steak Bites with Bloody Mary Dipping Sauce.

Festive, right?

These come from the super fabulous Rachael Ray so you know they’re good!

They’re bite-sized sirloin with a tasty sauce for dipping. But you could also use tenderloin tips.

Check out the recipe here – and have yourself a spooky dinner tonight!

Photo courtesy FoodNetwork.com.


April 13th, 2012

Brandy and Mustard-Glazed Tenderloin Steak Video

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Oh, this looks heavenly! The combo of sweet and savory is absolutely delish on a gorgeous tenderloin steak!

But you know you could use any cut you prefer.

Watch this video for a step-by-step how-to on this quick and easy meal. It includes side suggestions and easy instructions.

Couldn’t be simpler!

Happy cooking, everybody!


February 21st, 2012

Beef Jambalaya This Fat Tuesday!

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It’s Fat Tuesday and Mardi Gras is in full swing. But you don’t have to be in New Orleans to get in the spirit!

Try some Beef Jambalaya for a new twist on an old Cajun standby.

Everything’s better with beef, right? And this recipe calls for sirloin steak. You could try out tenderloin tips or another cut that tickles your fancy.

It’s Mardi Gras, for heaven’s sake! Laissez les bons temps rouler!

Click here for that fabulous Beef Jambalaya recipe – then make it your own!

Photo courtesy of TescoRealFood.com.


December 27th, 2011

Get Ready For New Year’s Beef!

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A lot of the holiday madness has died down, but we’ve still got one more to go – New Year’s Eve!

Try this amazing recipe for your dinner party or intimate dinner for two. However you choose to celebrate the coming of 2012, this beef tenderloin roast will make it special!

Order your beef here to make sure it’s the quality roast you need and then follow the recipe here for beefy greatness. There’s even a horseradish cream recipe to go along with it. You’re set!

But get ready now and order your roast soon to make sure it’s there before the holiday. Let me know how this wonderful meal turns out!

Photo courtesy of Ben Gebo Photography via ADoctorsKitchen.com.


December 14th, 2011

Holiday Beef Tenderloin

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Oh, how I love the holidays!

But if you’re like me, you stress about family and friends coming to your house and making a big meal (or mess – whatever the case may be).

I think two turkey holidays in a row may be a bit much. That’s why this time around a beef tenderloin roast is in order.

It’s elegant. It’s tender. And it makes the whole house smell divine.

THAT says “holiday meal” to me.

Here’s a fantastic recipe with a full menu suggestion, including sides and dessert. You can’t go wrong with this meal.

And here is where I get my beef tenderloin roasts so I don’t have to worry that the beef might not be up to par. I KNOW it is.

There are all sorts of roasts to choose from – from Chateaubriand to prerubbed beauties. Choose what you like! It’ll all be good.

And let me know how your holiday meal turns out – minus the scene Aunt Edna made in the living room.

Photo courtesy of KansasCitySteaks.com.

 


November 25th, 2011

Holiday Steak

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So, one holiday is down.

One to go.

Now’s the time to start planning for an amazing holiday meal that will surpass all others.

Maybe this one will feature a beef tenderloin so unique they’ll be begging you to repeat it year after year. Like the Pistachio-Crusted Tenderloin With Cabernet Sauce pictured above.

Wow.

Click here for more incredible recipes like petite steak sandwiches — AND wine pairings! Now that will make the meal – and your next holiday – absolutely complete.

Photo courtesy of Kendall-Jackson Winery via Marketwire.com.

 


February 17th, 2011

Coffee-Crusted Beef Tenderloin

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Sandra Lee is famous for knowing what she’s doing in the kitchen. That’s why I defer to her and anyone else with an authority in that area. I need to follow directions in the kitchen.

If I don’t, the results are disastrous.

So…this recipe for coffee-crusted beef tenderloin appeared on Good Morning America and it sounds absolutely divine. Get your beef tenderloin here for optimal results.

You won’t be sorry.

Thank you, Sandra Lee, for saving my kitchen from an explosion. I owe ya one.

Let me know how YOU enjoy this!


January 15th, 2011

Amazing Beef Stroganoff

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I LOVE this dish! And it’s perfect for these wintry, freezing days of January.

Make this for the people you love and they’ll KNOW you love them!

Click here to read about the history of Beef Stroganoff, including how it was named after Count Stroganov and why it was made for him. Fascinating.

Find the full recipe here. Don’t forget to make the incredible fried potatoes, too!

Enjoy!

Photo courtesy of FiveStarFoodie.com.


January 6th, 2011

Nutrition Labels on Meat?

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Beginning in 2012, the USDA will require meat producers to include nutrition labels on cuts of meat like tenderloin, ground beef and the like.

What do you think about this?

Overall, it seems like a good idea to me. Information is, after all, power.

BUT. . . people usually resist change. It’s scary.

So, what do you think? Is this a move for the better or are we becoming more and more Big Brother-like????

Read the whole story about the new changes here.


October 29th, 2010

Hungry for Halloween?

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She spends all day running four Kansas City haunted houses — making sure the ghouls are grotesque enough, the props are bloody enough and visitors will be sufficiently frightened.

But all Sherri Petz really wants is a great home-cooked meal. And she knows just what she wants.

Soups, stroganoffs and stews are on the menu this time of year and Sherri’s meals always get rave reviews.

Want to try a Spooky Stroganoff? Click here for Sherri’s recipe and other ghoulishly delicious dishes from her haunted kitchen. And try using this beef next time – it’s to die for!

No snakes or eyeballs necessary. Unless you really want to add them, that is.

Have a wonderful, safe and appetite-satisfying Halloween!

Photo courtesy of KansasCity.com.


August 20th, 2010

Cuts of Beef Simplified

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This just simply rocks.

If you’ve ever been baffled by what cut is what, this guide is for you.

Our friends at the National Cattlemen’s Beef Association and Cattlemen’s Beef Board put this together to make life easier for us. Wasn’t that nice?

Keep it bookmarked so you can refer to it again and again.

Have a great weekend, everybody!

Guide courtesy of BBQGuide.com.


June 28th, 2010

8 of the Most Expensive Cuts of Beef You Never Knew You HAD to Have!

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8 of the Most Expensive Cuts of Beef You Never Knew You HAD to Have!

You love steak, and even in a recession you want the best that money can buy.  But how much money are you really willing to drop to buy the “perfect” steak?

Let’s say you have an unlimited budget…what would be the best steak that your money could buy?  Here’s a list of the 8 most expensive types of beef.  The prices listed below are based on USDA Prime quality beef, but prices will vary according to your geographic location, the portion size, and grade of beef selected.

Not all beef is created equal.  If you want to eat the best steak of your life, it’s gonna cost you…and it’ll be worth every penny.

The Best of the Best

1)    Kobe Beef

This beef comes only from Kobe, Japan; therefore, costs more the further you travel from Japan.  What makes it so special?  Well, it comes from Wagyu cows that have been massaged with sake-fed grain fodder and given one beer a day.  This makes the beef tender, flavorful and wonderfully marbled.  You can find this in most of the top, high-end steakhouses in the U.S. like Japonais in Chicago.

At the Renga-tei Restaurant in Kobe, a cut of Wagyu, wrapped in rice paper and seared on an iron grill, then served with salmon and salad is $206.  Chef Varley’s “Triple Seared” Japanese Kobe in Las Vegas costs $33 an ounce.  So, an eight-ounce serving is $264.

www.jenius.com.au

2)    American Wagyu

This type of beef comes from Wagyu cows imported from Japan but raised here in the U.S.  They are rare (there aren’t very many of them) so they are expensive.  They, too, are tender and very flavorful.  You can find this type of beef at BLT Steak in New York City.  There, an American Wagyu 12-oz. ribeye runs $92.

3)    Tenderloin

Typically, the most expensive cuts of beef are taken from the most tender parts of the cow.  These are the parts that don’t get “overworked” in the animal’s lifetime.  Therefore, they’re tender.  Tenderloin is an amazing example of this.  Try The Tenderloin Room in St. Louis.

The “Pepperloin a la Tenderloin” dish at the Tenderloin Room (which consists of slices of specially seasoned, marinated tenderloin) costs $38.

4)    Filet Mignon

Now, this is exquisite.  Filet mignon is taken from the small end of the tenderloin (called the short loin) and is known as the “king of steaks.”  It can often be cut with a fork, it’s so tender.  My mouth is watering just thinking about it.  You can find delectable filet mignon at most any upscale steakhouse, but I prefer an at-home version delivered by the Kansas City Steak Company.  They’re widely known for their corn-fed beef – especially the filet mignon.

A 12-oz. filet at BLT Steak in NYC is $42.  Six 6-oz. filets from Kansas City Steak Company run $64.95.  Definitely a better buy.

www.kansascitysteaks.com

5)    Kansas City Strip

Strip steaks, taken from the short loin, are particularly tender, but not as tender as the tenderloin.  They can, however, but cut into thicker portions which is appealing to lovers of more rare beef.

Sometimes called New York Strip or Delmonico, you can find strip steaks just about everywhere!

www.ruthschris.com

6)    Porterhouse

Ahhh, the Porterhouse!  Part tenderloin and part strip steak, this hefty favorite divides the two with a bone that helps provide amazing flavor.  The Porterhouse has a larger side of tenderloin than the strip.  A T-bone is just the opposite.  Peter Luger Steak House in Brooklyn, NY, is famous for its 2-person Porterhouse.  Newsday describes it as “Fibrous, mineral-sweet beef, crusty and tender.”  Yum!

A single Porterhouse at the Tenderloin Room in St. Louis runs $39.

www.peterluger.com

7)    T-Bone

The yin to the Porterhouse’s yang, the T-bone is a more conventional favorite, yet still pricey in upscale restaurants.  The fact that this type of steak comes from the short loin section of the cow (and, thus, the most tender) makes it expensive.  Find a great T-bone at Ruth’s Chris Steak Houses across the country.  A good bet.

8)    Bone-in Ribeye (Cote de Boeuf)

It’s the bone that gives this cut its flavor.  Leave the bone in and you leave the rich flavor intact.  The ribeye comes from the rib section of the cow, which gives it its hearty flavor.  Bob’s Steak and Chop House in Dallas, TX, has a bone-in beauty to die for!

www.tenderloinroom.com


January 26th, 2010

Steak Recipe: Steak Tips with Peppered Mushroom Sauce

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Ooooo! Steak tips! Oooooo! Mushroom sauce! And what? Egg noodles?

I must have died and gone to heaven.

This is one of my absolute favorite meals. But I’ve never tried it with thyme or quite this way.

I can practically smell the onions, shallots and garlic cooking now. Can’t wait to try this one!

Little tip:  Wanna skip the cutting of the steak and ensure your beef is really, really tender? Try these already-sliced tenderloin tips.

Steak Tips with Peppered Mushroom Sauce

Adapted from Cooking Light January 2010

Yield: 4 servings

Ingredients

3 cups uncooked egg noodles

Cooking spray

1 pound top sirloin steak, cut into 3/4-inch pieces, fat trimmed

1 tablespoon butter

2 tablespoons finely chopped shallots

1 (10-ounce) package presliced baby bella mushrooms

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 tablespoon Worcestershire Sauce

3 tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 1/2 cups fat-free, less-sodium beef broth

1/2 teaspoon black pepper

1/4 teaspoon salt

3 fresh thyme sprigs

1 teaspoon fresh thyme leaves (optional)

Preparation

1. Cook noodles according to package directions, omitting salt and fat; drain.

2. While noodles cook, heat a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Coat pan with cooking spray. Add steak; sauté 5 minutes, browning on all sides.

Remove from pan; cover.

3. Melt butter in pan over medium-high heat. Add shallots and mushrooms; sauté 4 minutes.

Add garlic; sauté 30 seconds. Stir in Worcestershire Sauce. Sprinkle flour over mushroom mixture; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly.

Gradually add broth, stirring constantly with a whisk.

Add pepper, salt, and thyme sprigs.

Bring to a boil; cook 2 minutes or until thickened. Return beef to pan; cook 1 minute or until thoroughly heated.

Discard thyme sprigs. Garnish with thyme leaves, if desired.

Photo and recipe courtesy of ElizabethsEdibleExperience.Blogspot.com.


January 7th, 2010

Steak Recipe: Beef Tenderloin

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Doesn’t that look absolutely mouth-wateringly delicious?

This beef tenderloin with black peppercorn and mushroom sauce is a specialty at Lavendou in Dallas. Oh yum!

But — here’s the great thing — we have the recipe right here so you (and I) can make this at home!

You’ll need beef tenderloin for this recipe, and I like to use tenderloin tips — you can get them from my favorite place here.

Lavendou Recipe?Tournedos Felix Faure?Beef Tenderloin with Black Peppercorn and Mushroom Sauce

Recipe to Serve 4

The Ingredients

4- 8 oz Beef Tenderloin

2 Teaspoons of Salt

4 Teaspoons of coarse Black Peppercorns

2 Cups of  Diced  Mushroom

1 Tablespoon of Olive Oil

¼  Cup Butter

½ Cup of Cognac

½ Cup of Veal Stock

¾ Cup of Heavy cream

The Method Season both sides of each tenderloin with salt and pat them in the black peppercorns. Heat oil and butter in a large heavy skillet over high heat, and then sauté the tenderloins, 2 at the time, for 3-4 minutes on each side. Transfer the tenderloins to a heatproof dish and keep them warm in a 175 degree F oven.?In the skillet, add the mushroom, sauté for 2 minutes, until cooked. Add the tenderloin to the skillet and carefully add the cognac and flame it. Add the veal stock, then a minute after, the cream, bring to a boil for 2-3 minutes until the sauce thickens. ?Serve the tenderloin coated with the sauce with some Pommes Frites!

Photo and recipe courtesy of SavorDallas.com.


December 31st, 2009

Steak Favorites of 2009

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It’s New Year’s Eve and we are about to embark upon a new decade. Can you believe that?

So today I’d like to share with you my Top 10 Favorite Blog Posts of 2009. It’s been a year of great food and great adventures for me and my family. Thank you for coming along with us.

baconwrappedfilet-300x200

And . . . 2010 is full of promise. If I had a crystal ball, I’d see lots and lots of steak in my future. And yours.

But that’s just a guess.

Enjoy — and Happy New Year!!!!

TOP 10 FAVORITE STEAKY BLOG POSTS OF 2009

1.  Jan. 3 — The Tenderest Tenderloin

2.  Jan. 23 — Here We Go Kabob-ing

3.  Feb. 19 — Three’s Company

4.  Feb. 27 — Enchilada Steak Pie Recipe

5.  Apr. 8 — Beef Recipe:  Prime Rib Roast and Yorkshire Pudding

6.  Jun. 26 — Pizza. Beef. Scrumptious.

7.  Jul. 22 — Beefy Sliders

8.  Sept. 25 — Dreamy Meatloaf

9.  Oct. 6 — Steak and Grilled Broccoli

10.  Dec. 10 — O Steaky Night


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About Me

Hi! My name is Dena P., and I love steak. In fact, I’ve been on a quest for the perfect steak for a few years now.

I love experimenting with food and I like to get my family, friends and neighbors involved. They add a lot to my cooking experience by helping me perfect techniques and sharing recipes.

Read More About Me »

Steak Widget